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15 Jobs Similar to CNA (Certified Nursing Assistants)

Nurse portrait with arm crossed smiling.

So, you’re a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), and you’re looking for a change. Maybe you’re tired of working in a nursing home or hospital, or you’re just ready for something different. Luckily, there are plenty of other jobs out there that are similar to being a CNA. Here are 15 of them:

  1. Personal care aide
  2. Home health aide
  3. Hospice aide
  4. Nursing home administrator
  5. Surgical Technologist
  6. Physical therapist assistant
  7. Occupational therapist assistant
  8. Speech-language pathologist
  9. Nurse Case manager
  10. Health educator
  11. Sonographer
  12. Radiologic Technologist
  13. Clinical Technologist
  14. Medical Transcriptionist
  15. Respiratory Therapist

These are just a few of the many jobs that are similar to being a CNA. So, if you’re looking for a change, don’t worry. There are plenty of options out there for you!

Contents show

What is a CNA?

Nurse talking friendly to an injured man in a blanket in an ambulance car.

Before we can dive into all the different jobs that are available for those with a background as a Certified Nursing Assistant, it’s important to first understand exactly what a CNA is and what they do. A CNA, or Certified Nursing Assistant, is a vital member of any healthcare team. They provide basic patient care and support and often act as a liaison between patients and nurses.

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CNAs are responsible for a variety of tasks, including taking vital signs, assisting with medical procedures, providing emotional support, and answering patient questions. CNAs typically work in hospitals, clinics, or nursing homes, but there are many other opportunities available for those with this valuable skill set.

How to Become a CNA?

When it comes to becoming a CNA, there are two main routes you can take. The first is to complete a certified nursing assistant program, which can be found at many community colleges and technical schools. The second route is to complete an accredited nursing program and then take the certification exam.

This route is often more expensive and time-consuming, but it will give you a more well-rounded education that can lead to higher-paying positions down the road. No matter which route you choose, becoming a CNA is a great way to get your foot in the door of the healthcare industry and start building a rewarding career.

What Skills Does a CNA Need?

A certified nursing assistant, or CNA, is a vital member of the healthcare team. They provide basic patient care and support services under the supervision of a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse. CNAs typically work in hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and home health agencies.

To be successful in this role, CNAs need to have a variety of skills, including:

  • Compassion: CNAs must be compassionate toward their patients. This includes being able to empathize with them and providing emotional support.
  • Communication: CNAs need to be able to communicate effectively with patients, families, and other members of the healthcare team. They need to be able to understand and follow instructions.
  • Critical thinking: CNAs must be able to think critically in order to provide the best possible care for their patients. They need to be able to assess a situation and make decisions based on what they observe.
  • Interpersonal skills: CNAs need to be able to interact with patients and their families. They need to be able to build rapport and establish trust.
  • Physical stamina: CNAs need to be able to stand for long periods of time and lift patients. They must also have the physical strength and endurance to perform their duties.
  • Time management: CNAs must be able to manage their time effectively in order to complete all of their tasks. They need to be able to prioritize and plan their work.
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What Are a CNA’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

CNAs typically have a variety of duties that they must perform on a daily basis. These duties may include:

  • Assisting patients with activities of daily living, such as bathing, dressing, and eating
  • Taking vital signs, such as blood pressure, temperature, and pulse
  • Documenting patient information in medical records
  • Observing and reporting changes in patient’s condition
  • Providing emotional support to patients and their families
  • Assisting with medical procedures
  • Transporting patients to appointments and activities

Now that you know a little bit more about CNAs let’s dive into the list of the 15 best jobs for CNAs.

1. Personal care aide

Caring female personal nursing aide helping senior stroke patient do rehabilitation training.

Personal care aides help people with personal care needs, such as bathing, dressing, and grooming. They may also help people with activities of daily living, such as meal preparation and light housekeeping.

How to Become a Personal Care Aide?

There are no formal education requirements for personal care aides. However, many employers prefer to hire candidates who have completed a personal care aide certification program. These programs typically take between six and eight weeks to complete and cover topics such as infection control, safety, and First Aid.

Many states also require personal care aides to complete a criminal background check and pass a drug test. Some states have additional requirements, such as completing a tuberculosis test or receiving CPR certification.

What Skills Does a Personal Care Aide Need?

There are several imperative skills that a personal care aide must-have to ensure they can adequately take care of their patients. These skills are:

  • Patience: This is perhaps the most important quality that a personal care aide can have. Often, patients can be challenging, especially those who are dealing with chronic pain or other debilitating conditions. A personal care aide must be able to remain calm under pressure and be patient with their patients.
  • Compassion: A personal care aide must have a genuine compassion for others. This quality will allow them to better connect with their patients and provide them with the care they need and deserve.
  • Communication Skills: Personal care aides must be able to communicate effectively with their patients. This includes being able to understand what their patients are saying, as well as communicating instructions clearly.
  • Organizational Skills: Personal care aides must be able to keep track of their patient’s medication schedules, appointments, and other important information. This can be a challenging task, but it is essential in providing quality care.
  • Physical Strength: Personal care aides must be able to lift and move patients. Often, patients need help with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, and using the restroom. Aides must be able to safely lift and transfer patients to avoid injury.
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What Are a Personal Care Aide’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

A personal care aide provides basic care and assistance to patients who are unable to care for themselves. This can include activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, and using the restroom. Aides may also help with light housekeeping tasks, meal preparation, and transportation.

Personal care aides work closely with patients and their families to ensure that they receive the best possible care.

2. Home health aide

Nurse at home of senior woman using walker.

A home health aide (HHA) is a trained professional who provides basic medical and personal care services to patients in their homes. HHAs typically work with elderly or disabled patients, but they can also work with children and adults of all ages who need assistance due to illness, injury, or disability. A home health aide is similar to being a personal care aide.

They both work with patients in their homes to help with activities of daily living. Home health aides, however, also provide basic medical care and services. This may include taking vital signs, checking blood sugar levels, or giving injections.

Many times home health aides work with elderly or disabled patients who cannot care for themselves. Sometimes the job titles are interchangeable, so it is important to make sure you are clear on the job duties before applying.

How to Become a Home Health Aide?

Home health aides typically have a high school diploma or equivalent. These programs usually take between six and eight weeks to complete and cover topics such as infection control, safety, and First Aid. If you are interested in becoming a home health aide, there are a few things you need to do.

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First, you will need to complete a training program that is approved by your state. Once you have completed the training, you will need to take and pass a competency exam. After that, you will be ready to start working!

Home health aides who have any nursing or medical training are highly preferred by employers. Many times, these aides are able to provide more comprehensive care to their patients.

What Skills Does a Home Health Aide Need?

To be successful in this role, HHAs need to have strong communication and interpersonal skills. They must be able to understand and follow instructions, as well as communicate effectively with patients and their families. They also need to be patient and compassionate, as they will be working with people who are dealing with difficult situations.

In addition to these soft skills, HHAs also need to have some basic knowledge of medical terminology and procedures. They should be comfortable with providing personal care, such as bathing and dressing, to patients. And they should be able to take vital signs, such as blood pressure and temperature.

What Are a Home Health Aide’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

A home health aide’s (HHA) day-to-day responsibilities vary depending on the needs of their patient. However, there are some common tasks that HHAs perform on a daily basis. These tasks include:

  • Helping patients with activities of daily living, such as bathing, dressing, and using the restroom
  • Providing personal care, such as grooming and skin care
  • Taking vital signs, such as blood pressure and temperature
  • Preparing and serving meals
  • Helping with light housekeeping tasks, such as laundry and vacuuming
  • Providing transportation to doctor’s appointments and other errands
  • Administering medication
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3. Hospice aide

Senior man in hospice.

A hospice aide is a professional who provides support to patients and families who are dealing with a life-limiting illness. They may provide physical care, emotional support, or both. Hospice aides typically work in hospice facilities, but some may also work in the homes of patients.

How to Become a Hospice Aide?

Most hospice aides have at least a high school diploma or equivalent. Some programs may require certification, but it is not always necessary. There are many online and offline courses available to help you meet the requirements.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) also offers a voluntary certification for Hospice Aides called the Certified Hospice Aide (CHA) credential. If you want to become a hospice aide in certain states or give yourself a leg up on the competition, you will need to complete a training program that is approved by your state. After you complete the training, you will need to pass a competency exam.

Once you are certified, you will need to renew your certification every two years.

This training program will include classes like:

  • Anatomy and physiology
  • Communication skills
  • Nutrition
  • Patient rights
  • Safety
  • Infection control

What Skills Does a Hospice Aide Need?

There are several skills that a Hospice Aide must have in order to be successful in the role. These skills include:

  • Bedside Manner: Hospice Aides must be compassionate individuals who are able to empathize with patients and their families. They must be able to provide emotional support during difficult times.
  • Communication: Hospice Aides must be able to communicate effectively with patients, families, and members of the healthcare team. They must be able to understand and follow instructions.
  • Organizational: Hospice Aides must be well-organized individuals who can keep track of multiple tasks at one time. They must be able to prioritize tasks and maintain a clean and organized work environment.
  • Physical Strength: Hospice Aides must be physically strong enough to lift and transfer patients. They must also be able to stand for long periods of time and perform activities such as bathing and dressing patients.
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Hospice Aides typically work in healthcare facilities, such as hospitals, nursing homes, and hospices. They may also work in patients’ homes. Hospice Aides typically work full-time hours, although they may work weekends and holidays as needed.

Some Hospice Aides may be required to work overtime hours.

What Are a Hospice Aide’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

A hospice aide’s day-to-day responsibilities vary depending on the needs of their patients. In general, however, they provide basic care and assistance with activities of daily living. This may include tasks such as bathing, dressing, grooming, and toileting.

They also help with light housekeeping, errands, and meals. Hospice aides also provide emotional support to patients and their families.

4. Nursing home administrator

Beautiful senior woman smiles and laughs with mid adult hispanic nurse.

A nursing home administrator oversees the daily operations of a nursing home, ensuring that residents receive quality care. They are responsible for hiring and managing staff, developing policies and procedures, and maintaining budgets. Nursing home administrators typically have a bachelor’s degree in health administration or a related field.

How to Become a Nursing Home Administrator?

Specific requirements vary by state, but generally, you must have a bachelor’s degree in health care administration, business administration, or a related field, plus several years of experience working in long-term care. You must also be certified in your specific state. If you are not certified in the state where you want to work, you can usually take a state-approved certification exam.

What Skills Does a Nursing Home Administrator Need?

When it comes to your skills, you will need to be:

  • Organized: Nursing home administrators must be organized individuals who can keep track of multiple tasks at one time. They must be able to prioritize tasks and maintain a clean and organized work environment.
  • Communication: Nursing home administrators must have excellent communication skills. They must be able to communicate effectively with staff, residents, and families. They must also be able to handle difficult situations and resolve conflict.
  • Leadership: Nursing home administrators must be strong leaders. They must be able to inspire and motivate staff and maintain a positive work environment.
  • Critical thinking: Nursing home administrators must be able to think critically in order to make decisions that are in the best interest of the residents. They must be able to solve problems quickly and efficiently.
  • Interpersonal: Nursing home administrators must have strong interpersonal skills. They must be able to build relationships with staff, residents, and families. They must also be able to resolve conflict and handle difficult situations.
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What Are a Nursing Home Administrator’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

Nursing home administrators are responsible for the overall management of their facility. This includes everything from hiring and training staff to budgeting and marketing. They also play a critical role in ensuring that their facility meets all state and federal regulations.

On the daily, you will find nursing home administrators:

  • Meeting with department heads to discuss various issues related to the running of the facility
  • Reviewing reports from staff members on the progress of residents
  • Working with the finance team to develop and stick to a budget
  • Ensuring that all state and federal regulations are being met
  • Creating marketing plans to increase occupancy rates
  • Visiting with residents and their families to get feedback on their experience
  • Addressing any concerns that staff or residents may have

5. Surgical Technologist

Surgical team working in operating theater.

A surgical technologist is a healthcare professional who assists in surgical operations. They may be responsible for preparing the operating room and surgical instruments, helping to position the patient on the operating table, and Passing surgical supplies to the surgeon.

How to Become a Surgical Technologist?

Most surgical technologists have completed a postsecondary education program in surgical technology. Some states require surgical technologists to be licensed or certified. If you are not certified in your state, you can still become a surgical technologist by completing an accredited surgical technology program and passing the Certified Surgical Technologist (CST) exam offered by the National Board of Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (NBSTSA).

What Skills Does a Surgical Technologist Need?

To succeed as a surgical technologist, you need to have a lot of rock-solid skills that can’t be taught in a classroom. These skills will come in handy every single day on the job and will make you an invaluable member of any surgical team. Here are some of the skills you’ll need to succeed as a surgical technologist:

  • Stellar Stamina: Surgical procedures can be long and grueling, sometimes lasting for hours at a time. As a surgical technologist, you’ll be on your feet for the duration of the surgery, so it’s important that you have the stamina to last.
  • An Eye for Detail: Surgical procedures are extremely detail-oriented, and even the slightest mistake can have serious consequences. As a surgical technologist, you need to be able to pay attention to every detail, no matter how small.
  • A Steady Hand: Surgical procedures require a great deal of precision, and even the slightest shaking can ruin a delicate procedure. As a surgical technologist, you need to have a steady hand to ensure the success of the surgery.
  • Calm Under Pressure: Surgical procedures can be high-pressure situations, and it’s important that you remain calm under pressure. As a surgical technologist, you need to be able to think clearly and make quick decisions when the situation calls for it.
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If you have these essential skills, then you’re well on your way to a successful career as a surgical technologist!

What Are a Surgical Technologist’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

On the daily, a surgical technologist’s responsibilities include:

  • Preparing the operating room by setting up necessary equipment and sterile instruments.
  • Ensuring that all medical supplies needed for the surgery are available.
  • Assisting the surgeon and other medical staff during the surgery.
  • Cleaning and sterilizing the operating room after the surgery is complete.

6. Physical therapist assistant

Physical therapist assisting senior man at therapy.

A physical therapist assistant (PTA) is a healthcare professional who assists physical therapists in providing care to patients. PTAs typically have an associate’s degree in physical therapy, and they must be licensed or certified in most states. Physical therapist assistants work under the direction of physical therapists to provide therapy to patients.

They help patients regain movement and function after an injury or illness.

How to Become a Physical Therapist Assistant?

Most physical therapist assistants have an associate’s degree from an accredited physical therapy assistant program. Programs typically last two years and include classroom, laboratory, and clinical instruction. Coursework covers topics such as anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, and neuroscience.

Physical therapist assistants must complete a clinical internship where they work under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. All states require physical therapist assistants to be licensed. To be eligible for licensure, candidates must graduate from an accredited physical therapy assistant program and pass the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE).

Some states may require additional exams.

Continuing Education

Most states require physical therapist assistants to complete continuing education credits to maintain their license. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) offers many resources for continuing education, including online courses, conferences, and webinars. Physical therapist assistants can also pursue voluntary certification through the American Board of Physical Therapy Assistants (ABPTA).

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To be eligible for certification, candidates must have graduated from an accredited physical therapy assistant program and passed the National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE). Candidates must also complete a minimum of 400 hours of clinical practice.

What Skills Does a Physical Therapist Assistant Need?

As a physical therapist assistant, you will need to have excellent people skills. You must be able to communicate effectively with patients, families, and other members of the healthcare team. You should also be able to follow instructions and complete tasks in a timely manner.

In addition to strong communication and interpersonal skills, you will need:

  • The ability to lift and move patients
  • The ability to stand for long periods of time
  • The ability to stoop, kneel, and crouch
  • Good hand-eye coordination

What Are a Physical Therapist Assistant’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

Physical therapist assistants work under the supervision of licensed physical therapists to provide patient care. They work with patients of all ages who are suffering from injuries, illnesses, or disabilities. Physical therapist assistants help patients regain movement and function by developing and implementing treatment plans.

They may also provide guidance on how to prevent future injuries. Treatment plans may include exercises, stretching, massage, and the use of electrical stimulation and other modalities. In addition to providing patient care, physical therapist assistants may also be responsible for administrative tasks such as scheduling appointments, maintaining medical records, and ordering supplies.

7. Occupational therapist assistant

Female occupational therapist of Asian descent works with a cheerful senior female.

An occupational therapist assistant (OTA) works with patients who have disabilities, injuries, or illnesses that limit their daily living and work skills. OTAs help these patients improve their ability to perform everyday tasks so that they can live as independently as possible.

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How to Become an Occupational Therapist Assistant?

The first step to becoming an OTA is to earn an associate’s degree from an accredited occupational therapy assistant program. Once you have completed your degree, you will need to pass the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) exam to become a certified occupational therapy assistant (COTA). Some states require OTAs to be licensed in order to practice.

Requirements for licensure vary from state to state, but most states require OTAs to pass the NBCOT exam.

What Skills Does an Occupational Therapist Assistant Need?

If you want to be a successful occupational therapist assistant, you’ll need to possess certain skills. These include:

  • Compassion: You’ll be working with patients who may be dealing with pain, disability, or other challenges. It’s important to be able to empathize with them and understand their situation.
  • Communication: You’ll need to be able to communicate effectively with patients, families, and other members of the healthcare team. This includes being able to understand and explain complex medical information.
  • Organization: You’ll need to be organized in order to keep track of the patient’s progress and plan treatment sessions.
  • Physical stamina: Many occupational therapy treatments involve repetitive motions or standing for long periods of time.
  • Detail oriented: You’ll need to pay close attention to detail in order to carry out treatments correctly and document patients’ progress accurately.

What Are an Occupational Therapist Assistant’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

As an occupational therapist assistant, you would work under the supervision of an occupational therapist to help patients develop, recover, and improve the skills needed for daily living and working.

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Your day-to-day responsibilities might include:

  • Helping patients with physical therapy exercises
  • Using therapeutic techniques to help patients regain functionality
  • Teaching patients how to use adaptive equipment
  • Documenting patients’ progress

8. Speech-language pathologist

Female speech language pathologist teaching a child patient how to speak.

Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) work to prevent, assess, and treat disorders related to speech, language, cognition, voice, and fluency. They work with people of all ages, from infants to the elderly. Some common issues that SLPs help people with include:

  • Stuttering
  • Speech delays
  • Articulation disorders
  • Receptive and expressive language disorders
  • Swallowing problems

How to Become a Speech-Language Pathologist?

To become an SLP, you will need at least a master’s degree in speech-language pathology. Most states also require licensure or certification. You can find more information about how to become an SLP on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) website.

What Skills Does a Speech-Language Pathologist Need?

The skills required to be a speech-language pathologist include:

  • Strong communication and interpersonal skills: A speech-language pathologist must have strong communication and interpersonal skills because they will be working with patients who may be struggling to communicate effectively. They will also need to build positive relationships with their patients in order to help motivate them in their therapy.
  • Patience: A speech-language pathologist must be patient in order to work with patients who may be frustrated or discouraged. They will need to be able to provide support and encouragement while also helping their patients make progress.
  • Organizational skills: A speech-language pathologist must have strong organizational skills in order to keep track of their patient’s progress and plan effective therapy sessions.
  • Knowledge of language development: A speech-language pathologist must have a strong understanding of how language develops in order to effectively treat patients with communication disorders.
  • Knowledge of anatomy and physiology: A speech-language pathologist must have a basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology in order to understand how the body produces speech and how disorders can affect speech production.
  • Problem-solving skills: A speech-language pathologist must be able to effectively identify and solve problems in order to develop individualized treatment plans for their patients.
  • Ability to create treatment plans: A speech-language pathologist must be able to develop creative and individualized treatment plans that address the specific needs of their patients. Some SLPs may also work with individuals who have cognitive impairments or developmental disabilities. In these cases, they may need to adapt their therapy methods to meet the needs of their patients.
  • Strong assessment skills: A speech-language pathologist must have strong assessment skills in order to accurately diagnose communication disorders and identify the best course of treatment.
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What Are a Speech-Language Pathologist’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

To be successful as a speech-language pathologist, you will need to have excellent communication and people skills. You will be working with patients of all ages, so the ability to build rapport quickly is essential. You will also need to be able to keep detailed records of your patient’s progress.

Some of the day-to-day responsibilities of a speech-language pathologist include:

  • Conducting initial assessments of patients
  • Developing treatment plans
  • Implementing therapy sessions
  • Monitoring patient progress
  • modifying treatment plans as needed
  • documenting all patient interactions

In addition to the above responsibilities, speech-language pathologists may also be responsible for supervising assistants and other therapists. They may also be involved in research projects or teaching classes.

9. Nurse Case manager

A female staff nurse looing at camera.

A nurse case manager is a registered nurse who specializes in the care and management of patients with acute or chronic illnesses. They work with patients and their families to develop and implement care plans and coordinate the delivery of services by other healthcare professionals. Nurse case managers may also work in insurance companies or health systems, developing protocols for care and managing claims.

How to Become a Nurse Case Manager?

To become a nurse case manager, you will need to have a registered nursing license and at least three years of clinical experience. You will also need to complete a nurse case management training program. If you are interested in becoming a nurse case manager, there are a few things you can do to get started.

First, you will need to get a registered nursing license. You can do this by completing an accredited nursing program and passing the NCLEX-RN exam. Once you have your registered nursing license, you will need to gain at least three years of clinical experience.

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This can be done by working in a hospital, clinic, or other healthcare setting. After you have gained some clinical experience, you will then need to complete a nurse case management training program. There are many different programs available, so you will need to research the options to find one that is right for you.

What Skills Does a Nurse Case Manager Need?

If you want to be successful as a nurse case manager, there are several skills you will need to develop. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Patience: One important trait of a successful nurse case manager is patience. This job can be very challenging and frustrating at times, so it is important to be able to maintain your composure.
  • Excellent communication skills: As a nurse case manager, you will be working with a variety of people, including patients, their families, and other health care professionals. It is important to be able to communicate effectively with all of these groups.
  • Organizational skills: Another important skill for nurse case managers is the ability to stay organized. This job requires keeping track of a lot of information and making sure everything is in its proper place.
  • Impeccable Analytical Skills: Knowing how to analyze data is critical for nurse case managers. This includes being able to identify trends and potential problems.
  • Problem-solving skills: Nurse case managers must be able to identify problems and come up with solutions quickly. This job can be very demanding at times, so it is important to be able to think on your feet.
  • Detail-oriented: This job requires a high level of attention to detail. Nurse case managers need to be able to spot even the smallest changes in a patient’s condition and act accordingly.
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If you have these skills, then you may be well-suited for a career as a nurse case manager.

What Are a Nurse Case Manager’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

On a daily basis, nurse case managers are responsible for reviewing patients’ medical records, conducting research on various treatment options, consulting with other medical professionals, and meeting with patients and their families. They also create care plans, track patients’ progress, and provide support and guidance to patients and their families. In addition, nurse case managers keep abreast of new developments in the field of medicine and healthcare and attend conferences and seminars to stay up-to-date on the latest information.

10. Health educator

Health-care workers during educational program in medical school.

A health educator is someone who educates people about various aspects of healthcare, such as how to stay healthy, what to do in the event of an emergency, and how to use healthcare services. They may also work with specific populations, such as children, seniors, or people with chronic illnesses. Health educators may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, schools, and community centers.

How to Become a Health Educator?

If you want to work as a health educator, you will need several years of experience in the medical field as well as a bachelor’s degree in health education, public health, or a related field. Alternatively, you could also earn a master’s degree in health education. Once you have the necessary education and experience, you will need to obtain certification from the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC).

After you are certified, you can start working as a health educator in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, clinics, community health centers, and government agencies.

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What Skills Does a Health Educator Need?

As a health educator, there are several critical skill sets you will need in order to be successful. These include:

  • Public Speaking: You will be doing a lot of presentations and workshops, so being able to speak confidently in front of groups is essential.
  • Writing: You will need to be able to produce high-quality educational materials such as handouts, blog posts, and even multimedia content.
  • Research: A big part of your job will be keeping up with the latest research in your field so that you can provide accurate information to your audience.
  • Critical Thinking: You will need to be able to analyze complex data and make sound decisions about what information to share with your audience.
  • Organizational Skills: You will need to be able to manage multiple projects at once and stay organized while doing so.

What Are a Health Educator’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

This is a slightly unusual position, as there are many different settings in which a health educator might work. In some cases, they will be working in a school, teaching children about hygiene, nutrition, and other health-related topics. In other cases, they might be working in a hospital, helping patients to better understand their condition and how to manage it.

And in still others, they might be working in a community center, helping to promote healthy lifestyles and providing resources to those who need them. No matter where they are working, though, the day-to-day responsibilities of a health educator typically involve creating and delivering presentations, developing educational materials, conducting research, and evaluating programs. They also work to build relationships with community members, health care providers, and others who can help to support their efforts.

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11. Sonographer

Sonographers working together examining patient with modern ultrasound machine.

A sonographer is someone who helps take pictures of babies inside their mothers’ bellies. They use special machines that create images of the baby, and they often work in hospitals. This job is similar to a certified nursing assistant in that it requires working with patients and providing care.

How to Become a Sonographer?

If you want to become a sonographer, you will need to have at least an associate’s degree in diagnostic medical sonography. However, many employers prefer applicants who have a bachelor’s degree in the field. You will also need to be credentialed by the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS).

To maintain your credentials, you will need to complete continuing education credits. There are many ways to become a sonographer. You can attend a two-year community college, four-year university, or specialized training program. Many employers prefer applicants who have a bachelor’s degree in the field.

You will also need to be credentialed by the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS). To maintain your credentials, you will need to complete continuing education credits. Becoming a sonographer can be a rewarding career choice.

You will be able to help patients and families during difficult times and provide them with information that can help save lives. If you are interested in helping others and making a difference in the medical field, then a career in sonography may be right for you.

What Skills Does a Sonographer Need?

If you want to be successful in your sonography career, there are a few key skills you’ll need to master. These include, but are not limited to:

  • An understanding of human anatomy: This is essential in order to correctly interpret sonograms and provide an accurate diagnosis.
  • The ability to operate complex machinery: You’ll be responsible for operating ultrasound machines, which can be intricate and require a steady hand.
  • Exceptional communication skills: Since you’ll be working closely with patients, it’s important that you’re able to put them at ease and explain procedures clearly.
  • The ability to work well under pressure: Sonographers often have to juggle multiple patients at once, so it’s important that you’re able to stay calm under pressure.
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If you feel like you have the necessary skills to be a sonographer, then a career in this field may be right for you.

What Are a Sonographer’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

A sonographer is a medical professional who uses ultrasound technology to create images of the inside of the human body. These images are used by physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions. Sonographers must have advanced knowledge of human anatomy and physiology in order to produce accurate images.

They must also be able to operate the ultrasound equipment and understand how to interpret the images. Sonographers typically work in hospitals, clinics, or private practices. They may also work in research settings or perform mobile ultrasounds in patients’ homes.

Sonographers typically work full-time, and some positions may require evening or weekend hours.

On the daily, a sonographer can expect to:

  • Schedule and prepare patients for examinations
  • Record patient medical histories and symptoms
  • Explain the ultrasound procedure to patients
  • Position patients on the examination table and use gel to help obtain clear images
  • Operate the ultrasound equipment and capture images of the inside of the body
  • Observe and record images on a computer screen
  • Analyze images to look for any abnormal tissue or growths
  • Prepare reports of findings and present them to physicians
  • Maintain equipment and keep accurate records
  • May provide guidance and support to patients and their families regarding test results

12. Radiologic Technologist

Charming positive handsome radiologic technologist working at the medical facility.

A radiologic technologist is someone who uses medical imaging to diagnose and treat patients. They may use x-rays, sonograms, or other imaging technologies to look inside the body.

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How to Become a Radiologic Technologist?

If you are looking to become a radiologic technologist, you will need to complete an accredited radiology program. After completing the program, you will then need to obtain a state license.

In general, the process looks like this:

  1. Complete an accredited radiology program
  2. Obtain a state license
  3. Pass the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) exam
  4. Complete continuing education credits every two years

What Skills Does a Radiologic Technologist Need?

Due to the complex nature of the job, a radiologic technologist must have a wide array of skills and competencies. These include:

  • An understanding of basic human anatomy: This skill will allow the technologist to position patients properly for imaging.
  • An understanding of radiologic physics: This skill is necessary in order to produce high-quality images while minimizing exposure to radiation.
  • The ability to operate complex equipment: Radiologic technologists must be able to safely and effectively operate x-ray machines, computed tomography (CT) scanners, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines.
  • The ability to work well under pressure: This skill is necessary in order to maintain a high level of accuracy and quality in a fast-paced work environment.
  • The ability to communicate effectively: This skill is necessary in order to provide instructions to patients and relay information to the radiologist.
  • The ability to maintain a high level of detail: This skill is necessary in order to produce accurate images and diagnoses.
  • The ability to maintain a sterile environment: This skill is necessary in order to prevent the spread of infection.
  • The ability to work well as part of a team: This skill is necessary in order to function effectively in a collaborative work environment.
  • The ability to keep accurate records: This skill is necessary in order to maintain patient confidentiality and comply with HIPAA regulations.
  • The ability to troubleshoot equipment: This skill is necessary in order to quickly identify and resolve problems with imaging equipment.
  • The ability to make decisions: This skill is necessary in order to select the best imaging procedure for each patient.
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What Are a Radiologic Technologist’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

The everyday responsibilities of a radiologic technologist (RT) vary depending on their place of employment. Generally, however, an RT can expect to:

  • Operate x-ray machines and other radiologic equipment in order to create diagnostic images
  • Position patients and select the appropriate imaging techniques based on each individual case
  • Monitor patients during procedures and act quickly if any problems arise
  • Explain procedures to patients and provide emotional support
  • Ensure that the radiologic equipment is properly maintained and calibrated
  • Keep accurate records of all examinations performed

13. Clinical Technologist

Cancer treatment in a modern medical private clinic or hospital with a linear accelerator.

Clinical technologists work in hospitals and other healthcare settings to provide support for medical staff. They may work with X-ray machines, EKG machines, and other equipment.

How to Become a Clinical Technologist?

The education and training required to become a clinical technologist can vary depending on the specific job title and place of employment. However, across the board, if you want to become a certified clinical technologist, you will need to complete – at least – an accredited health sciences program and earn a bachelor’s degree in medical technology or life sciences. You will also need to pass the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Board of Certification exam.

To maintain your license, you will need to earn continuing education credits, such as through taking courses or attending conferences.

What Skills Does a Clinical Technologist Need?

Working as a clinical technologist requires many skills. Some of these skills include:

  • Analytical skills: Clinical technologists must be able to collect and analyze data from patients in order to make accurate diagnoses.
  • Communication skills: Clinical technologists must be able to communicate effectively with both patients and other medical staff.
  • Critical thinking skills: Clinical technologists must be able to think critically in order to identify and solve problems.
  • Detail-oriented: Clinical technologists must be able to pay attention to detail in order to accurately collect and interpret data.
  • Organizational skills: Clinical technologists must be able to organize their work in order to efficiently and effectively complete tasks.
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What Are a Clinical Technologist’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

The job responsibilities of a clinical technologist can vary depending on their specific job title and place of employment. However, there are some common day-to-day tasks that most clinical technologists can expect to perform. These tasks include:

  • Collecting and analyzing data from patients
  • Making diagnoses based on data collected
  • Communicating with patients and other medical staff
  • Identifying and solving problems
  • Maintaining accurate records
  • Completing administrative tasks

14. Medical Transcriptionist

Medical transcriptionist smiling. 

A medical transcriptionist is a person who converts voice-recorded reports into written form. This job is very similar to that of a CNA in that it requires excellent listening skills, attention to detail, and the ability to follow oral and written instructions.

How to Become a Medical Transcriptionist?

There are several different educational paths you can take in order to become a medical transcriptionist. Some medical transcriptionists have a high school diploma, while others have completed postsecondary education, such as an associate’s degree or certificate program. While you can find some entry-level medical transcriptionist jobs with just a certificate or diploma, most employers prefer to hire candidates who have completed an accredited medical transcription program.

There are community colleges and vocational schools that offer medical transcription programs. These programs typically take about nine months to a year to complete. Alternatively, you can also take an online medical transcription course.

These courses typically take about four to six months to complete. Medical transcriptionists usually work in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities. They transcribe doctors’ and other healthcare practitioners’ notes from audio recordings.

If you have a medical degree and are looking for a side gig to complete in your retirement, working as a medical transcriptionist could be a great option for you.

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What Skills Does a Medical Transcriptionist Need?

In order to be a good medical transcriptionist, there are several skills you will need to master before starting the job. These skills include, but are not limited to:

  • Stenography: This is the ability to transcribe audio recordings using shorthand. Medical transcriptionists need to be able to understand medical terminology in order to accurately transcribe what they hear.
  • Listening: This might seem like an obvious skill, but it is very important for medical transcriptionists. They need to be able to listen carefully to audio recordings and pick out the important details.
  • Typing: Medical transcriptionists need to be able to type quickly and accurately in order to keep up with the audio recordings they are transcribing.
  • Proofreading: Once a medical transcriptionist has finished transcribing an audio recording, they need to proofread their work to make sure that there are no errors.

What Are a Medical Transcriptionist’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

A medical transcriptionist is responsible for transcribing doctors’ and other healthcare practitioners’ notes from audio recordings. This includes dictated reports, such as discharge summaries, history, and physical examination reports, consults, laboratory reports, and more. Medical transcriptionists must be able to understand medical terminology, as well as the different accents and dialects that may be present in the recordings they transcribe.

They must also be able to type quickly and accurately. In some cases, medical transcriptionists may also be responsible for editing and proofreading their transcriptions for errors.

The day-to-day responsibilities of a medical transcriptionist include:

  • Transcribing doctors’ and other healthcare practitioners’ notes from audio recordings
  • Understanding medical terminology, as well as the different accents and dialects that may be present in the recordings they transcribe
  • Typing quickly and accurately
  • Editing and proofreading transcriptions for errors (in some cases)
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15. Respiratory Therapist

Asthma respiratory therapist.

A respiratory therapist is a medical professional who helps people with breathing problems. Like CNAs, they often work with elderly or sick patients. They also may work in intensive care units or emergency rooms.

How to Become a Respiratory Therapist?

In order to become a respiratory therapist, one must have graduated high school or have received a GED. After that, they must attend an accredited college where they will study respiratory therapy. Once they have completed their studies and achieved certification, they are eligible to begin working as a respiratory therapist.

In order to become certified as a respiratory therapist, one must pass the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) credentialing exam. Once they have passed this exam, they are then eligible to apply for state licensure.

What Skills Does a Respiratory Therapist Need?

Working as a respiratory therapist requires many high-level skills to complete your daily duties. Some of these skills include:

  • Strong critical thinking abilities: You need to be able to quickly assess a patient’s condition and make decisions about the best course of treatment.
  • Excellent communication skills: You’ll be working with patients of all ages, as well as their families. It’s important that you’re able to explain complex medical procedures in a way that everyone can understand.
  • Detail-oriented: You must be able to pay close attention to detail in order to properly care for your patients.
  • Physical stamina: You’ll be on your feet for long periods of time and may have to lift patients, so it’s important that you’re physically fit.
  • The ability to stay calm under pressure: When working in a hospital or other medical setting, you’ll be constantly surrounded by sick patients and their worried families. It’s important that you’re able to stay calm and collected in stressful situations.
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If you’re interested in becoming a respiratory therapist, then you’ll need to have these essential skills. Once you have them, you’ll be well on your way to a successful career in this growing field.

What Are a Respiratory Therapist’s Day-To-Day Responsibilities?

Respiratory therapists treat patients with breathing disorders. They work closely with physicians to develop treatment plans for their patients. They also provide education to patients and their families about breathing disorders and how to manage them.

In addition, respiratory therapists also perform diagnostic tests and monitor patients’ progress. The daily responsibilities of a respiratory therapist will vary. If you work at a hospital, you may be responsible for providing treatments to patients in the intensive care unit.

If you work at clinics, you may be responsible for providing respiratory therapy services to patients of all ages. No matter where you work, you will need to be able to communicate effectively with patients and their families, as well as with other health care professionals.

However, in general, the daily duties of a respiratory therapist include:

  • Assessing patients’ respiratory needs
  • Developing treatment plans for patients
  • Educating patients and their families about respiratory disorders
  • Performing diagnostic tests
  • Monitoring patients’ progress
  • Adjusting treatments as needed