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24 Different Types of Jobs for Teachers (Career Opportunities)

Portrait shot of a teacher.

Teachers are some of the most important people in our society. They help to mold the minds of our children and prepare them for their future. But, there are far more career opportunities for teachers than most people know about.

Here are just a few of the many different types of jobs that teachers can pursue. First, we’ll start off with the basics, but later in the article, we’ll get into some cool and even off-beat jobs for teachers.

1. Preschool Teacher

Preschool teacher with childrens.

First off, we have being a preschool teacher. Preschool teachers are responsible for the care and education of children aged three to five years old. They work in public and private schools, childcare centers, and other early childhood settings.

Most preschool teachers have at least an associate degree in early childhood education or a related field. Some states require preschool teachers to be licensed or certified. Parents have many goals for their preschool-aged children.

They want their children to develop social skills, learn to follow the rules and routines, and begin to understand academics such as numbers, shapes, and colors. Preschool teachers help children reach these goals by planning lessons that are both enjoyable and educational. They also create a safe and nurturing environment where kids can play, explore, and learn.

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Generally, your day-to-day activities will include:

  • Organizing and supervising play activities
  • Teaching basic skills such as counting, colors, shapes, the alphabet, and personal hygiene
  • Teaching rules and routines
  • Reading stories to the children
  • Serving meals and snacks
  • Maintaining records of the children’s progress, behaviors, and health

If you love working with young children and want to help them get a head start on their education, then being a preschool teacher might be the perfect job for you!

2. Kindergarten Teacher

A beautiful woman as kindergarten teacher.

Kindergarten teachers work with children aged five to six years old. They are responsible for the care and education of young students in kindergarten. Most kindergarten teachers have at least a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education or a related field.

Some states require kindergarten teachers to be licensed or certified. The goals of kindergarten are to prepare children for first grade and to help them develop social, emotional, and academic skills. Kindergarten teachers achieve these goals by planning lessons that are both enjoyable and educational.

They also create a safe and nurturing environment where kids can play, explore, and learn. The day-to-day activities of a kindergarten classroom are similar to those of a preschool classroom. The biggest difference really is the age of the students.

3. Elementary Teacher

A elementary teacher and girl.

As an elementary school teacher, you can work with students in grades one through six. This creates a lot of opportunities for diversity in your teaching experience. Teaching a first grader requires a much different set of skills than teaching a sixth grader.

You’ll need to be able to adapt your teaching methods to meet the needs of each individual student and each grade level. For example, in a first-grade classroom, you will focus on teaching your students the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic. You’ll also introduce them to basic Science and Social Studies concepts.

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In a sixth-grade classroom, you can dive deeper into each of these subjects and prepare your students for middle school. In addition to teaching core academic subjects, elementary school teachers also teach art, music, and physical education. Many elementary school teachers also take on the role of a guidance counselor, helping students with social and emotional issues.

Some of the daily activities you might find yourself doing as an elementary teacher include:

  • Planning and preparing lessons
  • Teaching lessons
  • Assigning and grading homework
  • Meeting with parents
  • Attending meetings and professional development workshops

If you’re interested in becoming an elementary school teacher, you will need to earn a bachelor’s degree in education and complete a teacher preparation program. You will also need to earn a teaching license.

4. Middle School Teacher

As a middle school teacher, you can work with students in grades six through eight. These are typically considered the “tween” years when students are between childhood and adolescence. Teaching middle school can be both challenging and rewarding.

During these years, students are going through a lot of changes, both physically and emotionally. They are also starting to develop more sophisticated thinking skills. As a middle school teacher, you will need to be able to adapt your teaching methods to meet the needs of these changing students.

This can include anything from using technology in the classroom to teaching more complex academic concepts. Some middle schools hire general teachers, while others allow you to focus on an area of interest for you. The latter schools generally have students on a gently rotating schedule, which prepares them for the high school environment where they change classes every day.

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For example, if you are primarily an English teacher, you may have a homeroom class that comes to you first thing in the morning, has their English class, and then does not return to your room until the end of the day for study hall. While your homeroom class is off in other rooms learning about different subjects, you will spend the rest of your day teaching other homeroom classes English and possibly have a planning period as well. The goal of middle school is to prepare students for high school, so the curriculum is generally more challenging than what is offered in elementary school.

In order to help prepare your students for high school, part of your job is also to teach study skills and organizational skills.

5. High School Teacher

A male high school teacher standing by lockers.

Ahh, high school. A time of growth, learning (or unlearning), and a bit of angst. As a high school teacher, you will have the opportunity to help shape the minds of tomorrow’s leaders (and future taxpayers!).

High school teachers generally specialize in one or two academic subjects, such as English, math, science, or history. This allows them to go into more depth than what is possible in a middle school classroom. Some of the most common academic specialties include:

  • English Language Arts
  • Mathematics
  • The Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Physics)
  • Social Studies (History, Government, Psychology)
  • World Languages (Spanish, French, Mandarin)

High school teachers may also teach elective courses, such as art or music. In some schools, high school teachers also serve as guidance counselors, helping students with college and career planning. In addition to teaching academic content, high school teachers also need to teach study skills and organizational skills.

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They also need to help students prepare for college and the workforce. This can include anything from writing a resume to taking the SATs. To become a high school teacher, you will need to earn a bachelor’s degree in education and complete a teacher preparation program.

You will also need to earn a teaching license.

6. Coach

Coach on green grass field.

Teachers are also famous for becoming coaches. In addition to teaching academic content or electives, you may also have the opportunity to coach a sports team. Coaches typically work with students in grades six through twelve.

They may work with middle school teams, high school teams, or both. As a coach, you will need to be able to motivate and inspire your team. You will also need to be able to teach them the skills they need to be successful in their sport.

This can include everything from dribbling a soccer ball to shooting a free throw. Some of the most popular middle and high school sports include:

  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track and Field
  • Volleyball
  • Golf
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Cheerleading

In order to become a coach, you will need to have experience playing the sport you want to coach. You will also need to complete a coach training program comprised of safety classes, such as first aid and CPR. You may also need to earn a coaching license.

7. Special Education Teacher

Special education teacher assisting special needs boy.

All students are different, and each one learns in their own way. This is especially true for students with special needs. As a special education teacher, you will have the opportunity to work with students who have a wide range of disabilities.

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These can include anything from physical disabilities to learning disabilities. Some of the most common types of disabilities include:

  • Autism
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Down Syndrome
  • Dyslexia
  • Hearing Impairments
  • Visual Impairments
  • Behavioral Disorders

As a special education teacher, you will need to be able to adapt your teaching methods to meet the needs of your students. You will also need to be patient and understanding. To become a special education teacher, you will need to earn a bachelor’s degree in education and complete a teacher preparation program.

will also need to earn a teaching license with a special education endorsement. In some states, you may also need to earn a master’s degree in special education. The goal of most special education programs is to help students become as independent as possible.

This can include everything from teaching them how to dress themselves to helping them find a job after graduation. Working with students who have special needs can be both challenging and rewarding. It is an excellent way to make a difference in the lives of others.

8. Adjunct Professor

College professor in class.

Now, entering the world of college, we have a different type of teacher: the adjunct professor. Adjunct professors are teachers who work part-time at colleges and universities. Adjunct professors typically teach one or two classes per semester.

They may also be responsible for holding office hours and grading students’ work. To become an adjunct professor, you will need to have a bachelor’s degree in the subject you want to teach. In some cases, you may also need to have a master’s degree or doctorate.

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Adjunct professors typically do not have the same job security as full-time professors. They are also often paid less per class than full-time professors. Despite these drawbacks, many people enjoy working as adjunct professors because it gives them the opportunity to share their knowledge with others while still having the flexibility to pursue other interests.

Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as an adjunct professor may include:

  • Preparing and teaching classes
  • Holding office hours
  • Grading student work
  • Creating and updating course materials
  • Researching your field of expertise

Adjunct professors typically have a more flexible schedule than full-time professors. This can be a great option for people who want to continue working in their field while also having the time to pursue other interests. Working as an adjunct professor is a great way to share your knowledge with the next generation of students.

It can also be a rewarding experience that allows you to make a difference in the lives of others.

9. University Professor

Smiling university professor in library.

Now, as a full-fledged university professor, you will have the opportunity to teach at the collegiate level. University professors typically teach undergraduate and graduate students. They may also be responsible for conducting research and publishing their findings.

To become a university professor, you will need to have a master’s degree in the subject you want to teach. In some cases, you may also need to have a doctorate. University professors typically have more job security than adjunct professors.

They are also often paid more per class than adjunct professors.

Despite these advantages, working as a university professor can be very demanding. It is often a high-pressure job that requires long hours. Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as a university professor may include:

  • Preparing and teaching classes
  • Conducting research
  • Publishing findings
  • Attending conferences
  • Supervising graduate students
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Salaries and requirements for university professors vary from establishment to establishment. However, most university professors need at least a master’s degree in the subject they wish to teach.

10. Tenured Professor

Senior professor explaining something to a student at the blackboard.

A tenured professor is a university professor who has been granted permanent status. Tenured professors typically have more job security than an adjunct or non-tenured professors. They are also often paid more and have more opportunities for advancement.

To become a tenured professor, you will need to have a doctorate in the subject you want to teach. You will also need to have several years of experience teaching at the collegiate level.

11. Research Scholar

Research scholar researching new trend by laptop.

A research scholar is a teacher who conducts research in their field of expertise. Research scholars typically work at colleges and universities. They may also work for government agencies or non-profit organizations.

To become a research scholar, you will need to have a doctorate in the subject you want to research. You will also need to have several years of experience conducting research. Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as a research scholar may include:

  • Conducting research
  • Writing papers
  • Publishing findings
  • Giving lectures
  • Supervising graduate students

Research scholars typically have a lot of freedom to choose their own projects. They also often have the opportunity to travel and present their findings at conferences. However, working as a research scholar can be very demanding.

It is often a high-pressure job that requires long hours, but if you love your field of study, it can also be very rewarding.

12. Private Tutor

A private tutor and student at home.

As a private tutor, you will have the opportunity to work with students of all ages. Private tutors typically work one-on-one with their students. They may also work with small groups of students.

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Private tutors do not need to have any formal education; however, clients will likely trust you more if you have a degree in the subject you want to tutor. For example, if you want to tutor calculus, having experience as a calculus teacher will give you an advantage over other tutors. Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as a private tutor may include:

  • Working with students one-on-one or in small groups
  • Designing lesson plans
  • Teaching classes
  • Assessing student progress

Private tutors typically set their own hours. They may also set their own rates. Working as a private tutor can be very rewarding. You will have the opportunity to work with students of all ages and help them to succeed.

13. Administrator

Portrait of businesswoman talking on mobile phone in modern office.

After years in the classroom, you know the ins and outs of the education system. You may also have a passion for working with people and solving problems. If so, you may want to consider a job as an administrator.

Administrators typically work at schools, but they may also work for government agencies or non-profit organizations. To become an administrator, you will need to have a bachelor’s degree. You will also need to have several years of experience working in the education field.

Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as an administrator may include:

  • Working with staff
  • Solving problems
  • Making decisions
  • Implementing policies
  • Creating budgets

School administrators typically have a lot of responsibility. However, they also have the opportunity to make a positive impact on the lives of students and educators. For example, administrators can create programs that help struggling students.

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They can also implement policies that make the education system fairer for everyone.

14. Policy Analyst

Young cheerful analyst in formalwear scrolling in touchpad while surfing for necessary data.

As a policy analyst, you will research and analyze education policies. You will also make recommendations about how those policies can be improved. Policy analysts typically work for government agencies or non-profit organizations.

To become a policy analyst, you will need to have a bachelor’s degree. You will also need to have several years of experience working in the education field. Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as a policy analyst may include:

  • Researching policies
  • Analyzing data
  • Making recommendations
  • Writing reports

Policy analysts typically work regular office hours. However, they may also need to work extra hours to meet deadlines. A policy analyst’s job is primarily to research and analyze education policies.

However, a policy analyst may also be responsible for making recommendations about how those policies can be improved.

15. Curriculum Developer

As a curriculum developer, you will create educational materials for use in the classroom. Curriculum developers typically work for school districts or education publishing companies. To become a curriculum developer, you will need to have at least a bachelor’s degree.

You will also need to have several years of experience working in the education field – especially in the subjects and grade levels you choose to write for. Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as a curriculum developer may include:

  • Researching education trends
  • Writing lesson plans
  • Developing educational materials
  • Testing materials

You can work developing textbooks, doing online learning, or even developing apps. Curriculum developers typically work regular office hours. However, they may also need to work extra hours to meet deadlines.

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Working as a curriculum developer is a great way to use your knowledge of the education field to create materials that will be used by teachers and students all over the country.

16. Item Writer

Acclaimed author writing her new book in office with bookcase.

This is kind of a specialized field. You’ll be creating questions, answers, and other content for standardized tests like the SAT, ACT, GRE, and so on. You don’t need any particular education to get started as an item writer.

However, you will need to be familiar with the format of the test you’re writing for – and you’ll need to prove that familiarity. These positions are usually part-time, so they might be a good fit if you’re already working in the education field and are looking for a way to earn some extra income. Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as an item writer may include:

  • Writing test questions
  • Writing answer explanations
  • Editing test content

Item writers typically work on a freelance basis. This means that they are not employees of the company that produces the tests. Instead, they are independent contractors.

Please note that if you are working on a state standardized test and you are still a classroom teacher, you will need to check with your state’s requirements to see if you can continue to develop items for that test. Developing items for a state you work in could be considered a conflict of interest.

17. Test Preparation Teacher

A high angle shot of students taking exam inside the classroom.

If you’re looking for a job that will allow you to work from home, this might be the perfect option for you. As a test preparation teacher, you will teach students how to take standardized tests. You will also help them to prepare for specific sections of those tests.

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To become a test preparation teacher, you will need to have at least a bachelor’s degree. You will also need to be familiar with the format of the tests you’ll be teaching for. Some of the tests you can help prep students for include:

  • The SAT
  • The ACT
  • The GRE
  • The LSAT
  • The TOEFL

Some of your day-to-day responsibilities as a test preparation teacher may include:

  • Developing lesson plans
  • Teaching students test-taking strategies
  • Administering practice tests

Test preparation teachers typically work for test prep companies or tutoring companies. They may also work as independent contractors.

18. Education Consultant

Education consultant with chinese student in office.

If you have a lot of experience in the education field and you’re looking for a job with a flexible schedule, you might want to consider becoming an education consultant. As an education consultant, you will provide advice and guidance to schools, districts, and educational organizations. You will help them to improve their policies and procedures.

You will also help them to implement new programs. To become an education consultant, you will need at least a master’s degree in education. You will also need several years of experience working in the education field.

Some of your daily duties as an education consultant may include:

  • Conducting research
  • Writing reports
  • Giving presentations

Education consultants typically work on a freelance basis. This means that they are not employees of the schools or organizations they consult for. Instead, they are independent contractors.

This can be a great job for someone who wants the flexibility to choose their own clients and set their own hours.

19. ESL Teacher

Young mom participates in a parent teacher conference with her daughter's preschool teacher.

Teaching English as a Second Language is a diverse career option that is available to teachers of all kinds. ESL teachers work with students who are learning English. They help them to improve their language skills.

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There are many different settings in which ESL teachers work. Some of these include:

  • Public schools
  • Private schools
  • Language schools
  • Online

The requirements for becoming an ESL teacher vary. For example, if you are looking to teach English online or abroad, the only requirements may be having a TEFL certification (which can be completed online) and being a native English speaker. However, depending on the institution, they may simply settle for a person who speaks fluent English (not even native English!) and has a TEFL certification.

Keep in mind, though, that the more experienced and certified you are, the better chance you have of negotiating a higher salary. If you want to teach ESL in the United States, you will need at least a bachelor’s degree. You will also need to be certified to teach English in your state.

20. Substitute Teacher

Undesirable substitute teacher.

Substitute teaching is a great option for teachers who are looking for flexibility. As a substitute teacher, you will fill in for teachers who are absent. This could be due to illness, vacation, or other reasons.

The requirements for becoming a substitute teacher vary by state. However, in some states, you can become a substitute teacher with a high school diploma, provided you pass the background check. Some of your duties as a substitute teacher may include:

  • Leading lessons
  • Supervising students
  • Enforcing school rules

Substitute teachers typically work on an on-call basis. This means that they are not guaranteed to have work every day. If you are looking for a teaching job that will give you a lot of flexibility, substitute teaching may be a good option for you.

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21. Teacher’s Aide

A young teacher's aide in the classroom with books.

A teacher’s aide is a support position for teachers. Teacher’s aides help teachers in the classroom. The requirements for becoming a teacher’s aide vary by state.

However, in some states, you can become a teacher’s aide with a high school diploma. Some of your duties as a teacher’s aide may include:

  • Assisting students with their work
  • Supervising students
  • Leading small groups

Teacher’s aides typically work in public schools. However, some private schools also employ teacher’s aides. If you are looking for a teaching job that does not require certification, you might want to consider becoming a teacher’s aide.

22. Instructional Designer

An instructional designer is someone who creates educational materials. Instructional designers typically work in the corporate world. They create training materials for employees.

However, some instructional designers also work in the education field. They create materials for teachers to use in their classrooms. To become an instructional designer, you will need at least a bachelor’s degree.

In some cases, you may also need a master’s degree or certification. Some of your duties as an instructional designer may include:

  • Creating lessons plans
  • Designing training materials
  • Developing assessment tools

If you are looking for a job that combines education and technology, you might want to consider becoming an instructional designer.

23. Teaching App Developer

Designers man drawing website UX app development.

Another position that combines technology and education is becoming a teaching app developer. As a teaching app developer, you will create apps for teachers to use in the classroom. To become a teaching app developer, you will need at least a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field.

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Some of your duties as a teaching app developer may include:

  • Designing apps
  • Programming apps
  • Testing apps

24. Afterschool Program Leader

A woman of African descent indoors in an office.

Finally, another job option for teachers is working in an afterschool program. Afterschool programs provide care and enrichment activities for students after school hours. Afterschool program leaders typically work with elementary school students.

However, some programs also serve middle and high school students. The requirements for becoming an afterschool program leader vary by state. However, in some states, you can become an afterschool program leader with a high school diploma.

Some of your duties as an afterschool program leader may include:

  • Organizing activities
  • Leading games and activities
  • Supervising students

If you are looking for a job that is focused on working with students, you might want to consider becoming an afterschool program leader.

Final Thoughts

Overall, there are many different types of jobs for teachers. If you are looking for a teaching job, there are many options to choose from. The best way to find a job that is right for you is to research the different options and find one that fits your skills and interests.

Be sure to consider all of your options and make the best decision for you.